MTC’s show will go on, but a live performance is not an option

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While many schools across the country have embraced the mindset of “the show must go on,” Methacton Theatre Company’s biggest roadblock was answering the question, “How do we perform a show?” MTC will continue to rehearse for The Laramie Project, a show they plan to record via Zoom.

STAFF WRITER Willy Cavallo, Staff Writer

While many schools across the country have embraced the mindset of “the show must go on,” Methacton Theatre Company’s biggest roadblock was answering the question, “How do we perform a show?” MTC will continue to rehearse for The Laramie Project, a show they plan to record via Zoom.

The MHS Theatre Company is trying to make the most things, like most of the other clubs affected by the COVID-19 pandemic. 

While many schools across the country have embraced the mindset of “the show must go on” MHS’s company’s biggest roadblock was answering the question, “How do we perform a show?” 

Other high school students have put together socially distanced and fully masked shows, which, as strange as that may seem to both performers and audiences, allows for highschoolers who are passionate about theatre to continue performing as normally as they can.

The MHS company discussed a few options: splitting up rehearsals with fewer cast members; recording the play on-stage and making that recording available; and performing the play using a video communications application. At the time this article, the company has been planning a virtual show using Zoom. They plan to make use of green screens to set the stage.

MHS theatre company presidents, seniors Jackson Fisher and LJ Paone, are disappointed in the lack of in-person rehearsals. Fisher described the reality as “extremely disheartening”. 

However, they recognize the upsides to online theatre. 

“Though this is not the ideal method of putting on a show, we are doing the best we can with the situation we are in,” says Fisher. “The upside to virtual rehearsal is that you can show up the minute you are needed and can leave the minute you are finished. It is more efficient when it comes to attendance,” he added. Paone said a silver lining exists in recording a show as well.

“A benefit of this is that you can refilm scenes if they get messed up, unlike live theatre, where you have to keep going.” 

Even with such unfamiliarities, the theatre company will continue to rehearse for The Laramie Project, the play they will perform in the new year. Junior officer Erin Donovan said The Laramie Project “is very touching and can spread a big message to society.” 

While Fisher could have given up the program this year, he chose to stick with theatre not only because of his “love for theatre,” but because he knows he “can not only get through this but help others make their way through an online atmosphere.”